Saturday Night at the Black: review by Lyn Ebenezer (Cambrian News 16 March 2017)

… a highly revealing book, which looks at the rock sub-culture of the ’60s and its relevance to one town. But its relevance to Cardigan is relevant to Wales as well.      … Cardigan in the ’60s was Wales’s pop-singing capital.

… The book is much more than a slab of nostalgia. No, it’s a reasoned chronicle of the forces which changed society for young people.

… This is one of the most interesting books I have read for a long time. It contains many interesting anecdotes, and is full of pictures of bands, the tickets, the programmes, newspaper cuttings and general memorabilia of the time.

… It is a volume you can turn to again and again, open any page and enjoy every word.

Lyn Ebenezer

Read the full review in the Cambrian News 16 March 2017

Saturday Night at the Black – new book

Copies selling fast: email     

netpool1960@gmail.com

to order a copy by post £12.50.

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties!

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties! (front cover)

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties! (back cover)

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties! (back cover)

Saturday Night at the Black: Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties. 183pp. with over 100 illustrations, many of which you will not have seen before, by William H. Howells. Price £10. Printed by E. L. Jones, Aberteifi. ISBN 978 1 78280 7698

Is Cardigan ready for this?

It’s a remarkable story! The background is the close connection between some of the town’s characters and those linked with the emerging Liverpool music scene at the time. People like the dramatist Alun Owen, who came to live in St Dogmael’s between 1963 and 1967; Allan Williams, the Beatles’ first manager; Bill Harry, founder and editor of the pioneering Mersey Beat newspaper; Bob Wooler, the Cavern’s famous DJ; and George Melly, who bought a summer house in Pen-y-bryn. This motley crew, with their partners, were warmly welcomed by Frank Aspinall, of the Black Lion, and with their help organised Liverpool bands to play in the Black.

The book contains a complete list of all the groups who played there between 1963 and 1973. At first they came from the Cavern – many via the Kaiserkeller and other Hamburg clubs. Do you remember the visit of Screaming Lord Sutch to Cardigan? What about Rory Storm and the Hurricanes; Ian and the Zodiacs; The Clayton Squares; Vince Earl and the Talismen; Freddie Starr and the Nightriders; Sony Webb and the Cascades; Derry Wilkie and the Pressmen; The Kirkbys; The Masterminds; The Chessmen and The Kinsleys and many more?

Later the groups came from South Wales: do you remember James Hogg, The Iveys; Haverson Apricot; Peter Shane and the Vikings – and let’s not forget local groups including Ricky and the Raiders and Strawberry Maize?

Every Saturday night over 200 teenagers flowed into the town from a wide area of Cardiganshire, Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire to dance, to listen to music and to enjoy.

But not everyone was happy with these developments. Parents warned their offsprings not to go near such a place, and the respectable town councillors were unhappy that the Black gave the town a bad image.

Cardigan has not seen anything like this before or since.

Read the truth about the connection of the Beatles with the local Eisteddfod!

Read about the close link between ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ and St Dogmael’s.

You’ll be surprised to read the candid memories of those who were a part of the scene.

Available in bookshops NOW £10.

or email netpool1960@gmail.com to order a copy by post £12.50.